Citing References Harvard Style Bibliography

The example paragraph below demonstrates how to integrate Harvard references into your writing, and how to format a Harvard style reference list.

For more information on how to reference, see the Student Services STUDYSmarter referencing guides, in particular the guides on quoting and paraphrasing. Note that these guides are not Harvard-specific; rather, they provide a general overview on the principles and practices of academic referencing.

 

Peggy Johnson defines collection development as “the thoughtful process of developing a library collection in response to institutional priorities and community or user needs and interests” (Johnson 2009, p. 1). According to Johnson (2009, p. 1), collection development forms part of the broader concept of collection management, which involves “ an expanded suite of decisions about weeding, cancelling serials, storage, and preservation”. Traditional collection development involves selecting individual titles that will best meet the requirements of the library users. In an academic library environment, the selection of titles should primarily support the teaching, learning and research needs of the university staff, students and researchers (University of Western Australia Library 2015). However, the practice of bundling journal titles into one large all-encompassing package has meant that collection development decisions are now often made on a publisher level, rather than on a title-by-title basis (Ball, cited in Carlson & Pope 2009, p. 385). In this sense aggregator packages are similar in nature to monographic blanket orders, where a library agrees to purchase everything that a particular publisher has published (Thompson, Wilder & Button 2000, p. 214). The beauty of these large aggregator packages is that they allow library users to access a vast number of online scholarly resources through the click of a mouse button. 

 

Reference List

Carlson, A & Pope, BM 2009, ‘The “Big Deal”: A survey of how libraries are responding and what the alternatives are’, The Serials
           Librarian
, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 380-398. Available from: Taylor & Francis Online. [28 September 2015].

Johnson, P 2009, Fundamentals of collection development and management, 2nd edn, ALA Editions, Chicago.

Thompson, K, Wilder, R & Button, L 2000, ‘Impact of bundled databases on serials acquisitions in academic libraries’, The Serials
          Librarian
, vol. 38, no. 3-4, pp. 213-218. Available from: Taylor & Francis Online. [28 September 2015].

University of Western Australia Library 2015, Collection management principles and policies. Available from:
          http://www.library.uwa.edu.au/information-resources/collections/management. [14 October 2015].

Why do I Need to Cite?

Harvard referencing can be a confusing task, especially if you are new to the concept, but it’s absolutely essential. In fact, accurate and complete referencing can mean the difference between reaching your academic goals and damaging your reputation amongst scholars. Simply put - referencing is the citing of sources you have utilised to support your essay, research, conference or article etc.

Even if you are using our Harvard style citation generator, understanding why you need to cite will go a long way in helping you to naturally integrate the process into your research and writing routine.

Firstly, whenever another source contributes to your work you must give the original author the appropriate credit in order to avoid plagiarism, even when you have completely reworded the information. The only exception to this rule is common knowledge - e.g. Barack Obama is President of the United States. Whilst plagiarism is not always intentional, it is easy to accidentally plagiarize your work when you are under pressure from imminent deadlines, you have managed your time ineffectively, or if you lack confidence when putting ideas into your own words. The consequences can be severe; deduction of marks at best, expulsion from college or legal action from the original author at worst. Find out more here.

This may sound overwhelming, but plagiarism can be easily avoided by using our Harvard citation generator and carrying out your research and written work thoughtfully and responsibly. We have compiled a handy checklist to follow whilst you are working on an assignment.

How to avoid plagiarism:


  • Formulate a detailed plan - carefully outline both the relevant content you need to include, as well as how you plan on structuring your work

  • Keep track of your sources - record all of the relevant publication information as you go (e.g. If you are citing a book you should note the author or editor’s name(s), year of publication, title, edition number, city of publication and name of publisher). Carefully save each quote, word-for-word, and place it in inverted commas to differentiate it from your own words. Tired of interrupting your workflow to cite? Use our Harvard referencing generator to automate the process

  • Manage your time effectively - make use of time plans and targets, and give yourself enough time to read, write and proofread

  • When you are paraphrasing information, make sure that you use only your own words and a sentence structure that differs from the original text

  • Save all of your research and citations in a safe place - organise and manage your Harvard style citations.

If you carefully check your college or publisher’s advice and guidelines on citing and stick to this checklist, you should be confident that you will not be accused of plagiarism.

Secondly, proving that your writing is informed by appropriate academic reading will enhance your work’s authenticity. Academic writing values original thought that analyzes and builds upon the ideas of other scholars. It is therefore important to use Harvard style referencing to accurately signpost where you have used someone else’s ideas in order to show that your writing is based on knowledge and informed by appropriate academic reading. Citing your sources will demonstrate to your reader that you have delved deeply into your chosen topic and supported your thesis with expert opinions.

Here at Cite This For Me we understand how precious your time is, which is why we created our Harvard citation generator and guide to help relieve the unnecessary stress of citing. Escape assignment-hell and give yourself more time to focus on the content of your work by using Cite This For Me citation management tool.

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